Today's News & Commentary — September 11

Published September 11th, 2014 -  - 09.11.141


The Wall Street Journal reports that Gina Raimondo has won Rhode Island’s Democratic primary, beating labor-backed candidates. Raimondo was the state’s General Treasurer, and supported a controversial plan for pension reform while in office. Rhode Island’s public sector unions are suing Raimondo over the changes in pension plans.

The New York Times reports that small business owners should take a second look at their social media policies after the National Labor Relations Board’s recent decision in the Triple Play case. The agency found that Triple Play illegally infringed on its employees’ protected rights after the bar fired two workers who posted and “liked” comments on Facebook.

The New York Times reports that Local 802 of the American Federation of Musicians, the union that represents musicians at the Met, have ratified the labor agreement that the union reached with their employer last month. The American Guild of Musical Artists, which represents the chorus, dancers, soloists, and stage managers, is the only remaining union whose members have yet to ratify the agreement. They are expected to do so this Friday. On Labor has covered the labor controversy at the Met extensively.

The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra is also experiencing labor issues, according to the New York Times. After a 2012 lockout, the Symphony’s musicians agreed to pay cuts and a shorter workweek (which reduced pay by 14-15%). The employees’ contract expires at midnight on Saturday. Management’s proposed contract would further reduce take home pay for the musicians.

Small companies are increasingly using a “temp to perm” hiring model, the New York Times reports. The employer either pays potential employees consulting fees as they work on a trial basis, or workers are hired on temporary contracts. Advocates say the model helps with recruiting employees who are wary of accepting a job after a short interview. During the trial period employers might ask potential workers to complete three weeks of work in one, with little guidance from management.

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