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Politics

Work-Related Distortions in the Proposed Tax Bills: Understanding the Policy Conversations (Part 2 of 2)

Work-Related Distortions in the Proposed Tax Bills: Understanding the Policy Conversations (Part 2 of 2)

This post follows up on our prior post, which focused on the complex provisions of the proposed Senate tax bill. This post discusses some of the key concerns that have been expressed about the new tax bill. (Again, we focus here on the Senate version of the proposed legislation. The specifics of the analysis may change once we get the Conference version, though the broader policy and design questions are likely to persist.)

Work-Related Distortions in the Tax Reform Bills: Understanding the New Proposed Provisions (Part 1 of 2)

Work-Related Distortions in the Tax Reform Bills: Understanding the New Proposed Provisions (Part 1 of 2)

The New York Times ran a piece on December 9, 2017, entitled “Tax Plans Might Give Your Co-Worker a Better Deal Than You.” The article highlights ways in which the proposed tax reforms (some in the House bill, some in the Senate bill) would draw new tax distinctions among workers, creating problematic and inequitable tax discontinuities. Specifically, the article makes a few key observations:

Kap, Collusion, and Labor Market Competition

Kap, Collusion, and Labor Market Competition

There are only a few dozen people on the planet who can play QB in the NFL. Colin Kaepernick is one of them. Yet, even though he’s expressed an eagerness to return to the playing field, Kaepernick has now been passed over for QB positions on several clubs. Many NFL stars--including Tom Brady, Richard Sherman, and Brandon Weedon (who was recently hired over Kaepernick for the Ravens’ backup role)--are convinced that Kap’s got the talent to be on the field. If that’s true, then why is he still out of work?