Tag

arbitration

Today’s News & Commentary

Today’s News & Commentary

On the cusp of an ideological majority for the first time in over half a century, the U.S. Supreme Court begins its new term today, again – like in 2016 – with an 8-Justice lineup.  While the fate of the current nominee is uncertain, the Court is slated for what...

Murphy Oil Opinion

Murphy Oil Opinion

The Supreme Court holds this morning in Murphy Oil that class and collective action bars in arbitration agreements are enforceable under the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA) and are not incompatible with the NLRA.  The majority opinion by Justice Gorsuch is notable...

New Prime Inc. v. Oliveira

New Prime Inc. v. Oliveira

At the end of February, the Supreme Court granted cert. in New Prime, Inc. v. Oliveira.  In so doing, the Court added to the list of cases that examine how and to what extent the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA) applies in the employment context (see our coverage of...

An Ominous Denial of Certiorari

An Ominous Denial of Certiorari

Last week the Supreme Court passed up an opportunity to resolve a hotly disputed aspect of employment arbitration law: Whether judges or arbitrators should decide whether class (or collective) arbitration is available when an arbitration agreement is silent on the subject.  The Court’s denial of certiorari in Opalinski v. Robert Half International, Inc., 583 U.S. — (No. 16-1456) (Order List of October 30, 2017, p. 10) thus put a precipitous and somewhat unexpected end to a bit of suspense about this case over the last few months.  While the arbitration spotlight is currently focused on the Court’s consideration of whether enforcement of class arbitration waivers violate the National Labor Relations Act, see, Epic Systems Corp. v Lewis, No. 16-285 (argued in tandem with Ernst & Young LLP v. Morris, No. 16-300 and N.L.R.B. v. Murphy Oil USA, No. 16-307 on October 2, 2017), lurking in the shadows is a corollary issue presented in Opalinski:  What happens when an employment agreement specifying arbitration does not contain such a class action waiver?  That is, if an agreement says nothing about class arbitration one way or the other, who decides whether class treatment is permissible?  More precisely, is class treatment a procedural question for an arbitrator or is it a gateway arbitrability question for a judge to decide?