Today's News and Commentary — April 1, 2016

Published April 1st, 2016 -  - 04.01.164


The U.S. National Women’s soccer team is filing a complaint alleging pay discrimination against the U.S. Soccer Foundation, according to JDSupra.  Citing the USSF’s 2015 financial report, the filing alleges that the female players were paid almost four times less than the male players last year, despite earning $20 million more in revenue.  The women will likely try to make out a claim under the Equal Pay Act by showing that the jobs require “substantially equal skill, effort and responsibility, and that are performed under similar working conditions within the same establishment.”

Politico highlights a couple of developments in the fight for $15.  The California state legislature passed a proposal on Thursday to raise the hourly minimum wage from the current $10 to $15 by 2022.  SEIU-Healthcare Workers West have been credited with initiating the bill after the union filed a ballot initiative to raise the minimum wage to $15 by 2021.  Also on Thursday, state legislative leaders in New York City announced an agreement to increase the minimum wage to $15 in NYC by the end of 2018 and in other areas of the state in the years that follow.

The New York Times reports that Hilary Clinton plans to unviel a $10 billion plan to increase manufacturing jobs.  Part of the plan depends on “Make It In America” partnerships that will encourage companies to invest in American workers.  The plan would be funded by stripping corporations that move job overseas of tax benefits.

Also per the NYT, the job report released by the Labor Department today reflects a steady job market that continues to add jobs.  Overall in March, 215 jobs were added, the labor force increased slightly to 63%, and average hourly earnings rose by .3% (notably more than the projected .1%).  In line with this, the Wall Street Journal reports that the number of jobless claims filed by Americans topped off at a seasonally adjusted 276,000, continuing the longest streak of weeks under 300,000 since 1973.

 

 

 

 

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