Reader Poll: What Were the Biggest Developments in Labor This Year?

Published December 15th, 2014 -  - 12.15.1410


Looking back on 2014, it is clear that this has been (for better and worse) a major year in labor.  From the Supreme Court to Chattanooga, TN, and from Northwestern football to McDonald’s restaurants, a lot has happened.  Here at OnLabor, we’re interested in your views on what the most important labor developments have been over the past twelve months.  So, to take advantage of the expertise and experience of our readership, we’re running our first ever reader poll.

To get things started, we’ve put together a partial list (not in any particular order) of what seem to us major developments from 2014. But we want to hear from you.  So let us know your thoughts by completing the poll.  You can use the options we’ve provided or suggest ones we’ve left out.  Once we hear from you, we’ll post the results at OnLabor.

1.  The Supreme Court’s decision in Harris v. Quinn.  (We extensively covered the pre-game analysis, the decision, and some of its implications).

2.  The Supreme Court’s decision to dismiss Mulhall. (We covered the lead-up to the case, our reactions to the oral arguments, some perspectives from around the political spectrum, and the implications of the dismissal).

3.  The UAW’s loss at VW in Chattanooga, TN. (Which we explained, covered, and analyzed)

4.  VW’s decision to engage in “constructive dialogue” with worker organizations at the Chattanooga plant.  (Which we covered and provided some analysis of the legal issues).

5.  The ALJ decision that Northwestern football players are “employees” within the meaning of the National Labor Relations Act.  (We covered the decisionits background, and some of its implications for football players and other athletes).

6.  The NLRB general counsel’s decision to authorize complaints against McDonalds as a joint employer.  (We covered the decision, some of its implications, and some disagreeing viewpoints).

7.  The fast food campaign.

8.  The new NLRB election rule.

9.  The political success of minimum wage laws.

10.  Market Basket.

Vote below!

(To add your own answer, select “other” and start typing after the colon — the textbox will appear).

 

10 recommended
103 views
bookmark icon