Benjamin Sachs
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Benjamin Sachs

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Show BioHide BioBenjamin Sachs is the Kestnbaum Professor of Labor and Industry at Harvard Law School and a leading expert in the field of labor law and labor relations. Professor Sachs teaches courses in labor law, employment law, and law and social change, and his writing focuses on union organizing and unions in American politics.  Prior to joining the Harvard faculty in 2008, Professor Sachs was the Joseph Goldstein Fellow at Yale Law School.  From 2002-2006, he served as Assistant General Counsel of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) in Washington, D.C.  Professor Sachs graduated from Yale Law School in 1998, and served as a judicial law clerk to the Honorable Stephen Reinhardt of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. His writing has appeared in the Harvard Law Review, the Yale Law Journal, the Columbia Law Review, the New York Times and elsewhere.  Professor Sachs received the Yale Law School teaching award in 2007 and in 2013 received the Sacks-Freund Award for Teaching Excellence at Harvard Law School.  He can be reached at bsachs@law.harvard.edu.

191 posts

Conservatives, Alt-Labor, and "Coercion"

Published October 21st, 2013 -

Jack posted an excellent set of comments last week on Robert VerBruggen’s piece Why Conservatives Should Love Alt-Labor.  Both the piece and Jack’s comments are worth a close read.  I agree with VerBruggen and Jack that alt-labor should appeal to libertarians.... More »

Unions and Political Equality – A New Approach

Published October 8th, 2013 -

I have a new Essay in the Yale Law Journal – The Unbundled Union: Politics Without Collective Bargaining.  The piece argues that we can advance the goal of political equality by enabling workers to organize unions for political purposes even when the workers c... More »

Cert. Granted in Harris v. Quinn

Published October 1st, 2013 -

The Supreme Court this morning granted cert. in Harris v. Quinn.  Here are some reasons why this was the wrong decision.  We will have more analysis and commentary in the days ahead. More »

Harris v. Quinn: Why the Court Should Deny Review

Published October 1st, 2013 -

Max has an excellent Explainer on Harris v. Quinn, a seventh circuit case involving the homecare workers’ union in Illinois.  The Supreme Court conferenced on a cert. petition in Harris yesterday.  The question raised by the petition is whether the “fair share... More »

Cory Booker and Labor

Published September 26th, 2013 -

Josh Eidelson at Salon has a good piece about Newark’s paid sick leave bill and the question of Cory Booker’s support for the legislation.  We’ve covered Booker’s relationship with labor – and the teachers’ unions in particular – here. More »

Has the Employer in Mulhall Confessed to a Felony?

Published September 23rd, 2013 -

As we have already discussed, UNITE HERE Local 355 v. Mulhall is a case with potentially enormous implications and, yet, a case that the Court probably should not have taken.  Jack has written about three problems with the Mulhall grant.  But the employer’s br... More »

WSJ Columnist Jenkins Gets Works-Council Law Wrong

Published September 19th, 2013 -

In yesterday’s Wall Street Journal, Holman Jenkins weighs in on the VW-UAW discussions about a German-style works council at VW’s plant in Chattanooga, TN.  Although the automaker and the union have concluded that such a council would be legal in the U.S... More »