Where Tips End and Wages Begin

One year ago, this blog featured a post that outlined various reasons why the restaurant industry’s use of tips in lieu of guaranteed wages had come to provoke, in the author’s words, “a firestorm of criticism”: that reliance on tips as a significant component of server take-home pay 1) destined many servers to earning a sub-minimum wage; 2) encouraged female servers to tolerate sexual harassment by their customers; and 3) resulted in pay discrimination unrelated to the quality of servers’ work, a consequence of customer biases and their impacts on the amounts tipped.

Since the post’s publication, this firestorm has continued unabated. In fact, Uber even pointed to customer bias as a reason not to add a tipping function to its ride-sharing app, as its competitor Lyft has done. Moreover, recent modeling by FiveThirtyEight illustrates the volatility of tip-based incomes in the restaurant industry, as well as divisions between different classes of restaurants vis-à-vis the tipped amounts that their servers typically earn, which further underscores the question whether tipping can serve as a reliable substitute for set pay.

In this vein, a recent opinion out of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit sheds new light on the shortcomings of tipping as a reliable form of compensation, highlighting the dangers posed to employees by the liminal space between “tips” and “wages” under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

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Those Job Crushing Regulations

Donald Trump and the Republicans in Congress love to refer to regulations as “job crushing.”  When Trump spoke recently at the Conservative Political Action Conference he not only said that companies can’t hire because of regulations, but he also said that “we’re going to put the regulation industry out of work and out of business.”  Trump has already taken steps to make it much harder for government agencies to do their jobs.  When he came into office, he imposed a hiring freeze, and he issued an executive order decreeing that the cost of all new regulations issued by each department or agency for fiscal year 2017 can’t be greater than zero regardless of the benefits to be gained from the regulations.  Now, Trump has proposed a budget that would dramatically slash the budgets of most federal agencies.  Government “regulators” do a great deal of important work to help sand some of the harshest edges off of our capitalist economy.  I’ll leave it to others to talk about the importance of environmental and food safety regulations, but workers desperately need a vigilant Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to protect them from injuries and chemical exposure on the job.  To take just one example, in the last days of the Obama Administration, OSHA issued citations to a manufacturing company after two workers suffered severe hand injuries within ten days due to the company’s failure to install proper safety guards on its machines. While the consequences of inadequate wage and hour regulation are less dramatic, a recent Tenth Circuit case illustrates why there is such a pressing need for the government to monitor workplaces.

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